Art News: Casey Gray at White Walls, Vatican Opens Room For Matisse & Quantitive Chemical Analysis of Leonardo Da Vinci’s Faces

23 Jul
2010

CASEY GRAY AT WHITE WALLS

Ill Romantic

Casey Gray‘s exhibition titled Ill Romantic features pieces which draw upon the duality of attraction and repulsion as it exists in relation to the human heart.  Casey Gray composes his mixed media pieces through a meticulous process of stenciling, layering, and various urban media techniques, a process which in many ways reflects the conceptual nature of his work’s focus on true romanticism versus an idea of a commodified, culturally constructed, escapist romanticism.

Does This Taste Funny To You

Double Pegasus With Cheese

Fog

Ice

The Sun Shines Out of Her Ass

The exhibition runs through August 7, 2010 at White Walls, San Francisco.

VATICAN OPENING ROOM DEDICATED TO MATISSE

Later this year, the Vatican Museums in Rome are set to open a room devoted to the works of Matisse, in an effort to try and further boost it’s profile of modern and contemporary religious art department. Large-scale preparatory sketches by the French artist, will go on public display for the first time. The works were donated to the Vatican by the artist’s son Pierre in 1980. Read whole article: artnewspaper

QUANTITIVE CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF LEONARDO DA VINCI’S FACES

How did Leonardo Da Vinci manage to paint such perfect faces? For the first time a quantitative chemical analysis has been done on seven paintings by Leonardo Da Vinci, without extracting any samples, directly in the rooms of the Louvre Museum. Paintings include: Virgin of the Rocks, Mona Lisa, Saint John the Baptist, Annunciation, Bacchus, Belle Ferronnière, Saint Anne, the Virgin and the Child. The results and what they reveal has been published in the July 15, 2010  journal Angewandte Chemie International Edition.

For the first time, Philippe Walter (LC2RMF) and his team, in collaboration with the ESRF and the Louvre Museum, have brought new insight on the sfumato technique used by Leonardo thanks to a quantitative chemical study of the different painted layers. Read whole article: artknowledge

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