Art News: Robert Melee Installation, Leonardo Da Vinci Exhibit at Getty & Muhammed’s Descendants Suing Over Islamic Cartoons

22 Mar
2010

ROBERT MELEE INSTALLTION AT DAVID KORDANSKY GALLERY IN L.A.

Robert Melee, born 1966, attended The School of Visual Arts and works and lives in New Jersey. His work is often compared to that of John Waters and Andy Warhol due to its overt campness. His new installation exhibit is currently being held at the David Kordanky Gallery in Los Angeles through April 17, 2010.

LEONARDO DA VINCI AND THE ART OF SCULPTURE: INSPIRATION AND INVENTION EXHIBIT

Opening tomorrow, March 23 through June 20, 2010, the exhibition examines just one facet of Leonardo’s prodigious talents: his activity in the field of sculpture. It examines many of Leonardo’s drawings, highlighting his working method of sketching ideas and notes for his artistic compositions and devices, which do not survive. Sketches for lost sculptures and paintings reveal an artist who used pen and paper to develop models for equestrian and human monuments and sculptures, medals and paintings, as well as to work out the engineering of mechanical devices such as water clocks, robots, and automata.

John the Baptist Preaching to a Pharisee and a Levite

The exhibition also features three larger-than-life-size bronze figures by Giovan Francesco Rustici (seen above), recently restored in Florence and never before seen outside Italy. Leonardo and Rustici worked closely together, and Rustici was immersed in Leonardo’s studio practice. Because of their collaborations and similar aesthetic, Rustici’s work is considered the best echo of Leonardo’s lost activity as a sculptor. Visit the Getty Center for more info.

MUHAMMED’S DESCENDANTS SUING OVER ISLAMIC CARTOONS

Close to 95,000 descendants of the prophet Muhammed are planning to bring libel action over the cartoons in Britian, even though the cartoons appeared in the Danish press. The cartoons which first appeared in the Jyllands-Posten newspaper in 2005, ignited violent protests around the world, some of which escalated into violence with police firing on the crowds (resulting in more than 100 deaths, all together).  Critics of the cartoons described them as Islamophobic or racist, and argued that they are blasphemous to people of the Muslim faith, are intended to humiliate a Danish minority, or are a manifestation of ignorance about the history of Western imperialism.

The suit is expected to be justified by claiming that the cartoons, including one of Muhammad wearing a bomb-shaped turban, were accessible in Britain on the internet. Read whole article: timesonline.

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