Art News: The 28th Annual FIFA (Festival of Film on Art), A Stolen Rembrandt, & Picasso’s ‘Absinthe Drinker’ Up For Auction

17 Mar
2010

INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL OF FILMS ON ART

The 1st FIFA opened in 1981. Of a duration of 5 days, the 1st FIFA presented 50 films from 12 countries in one theatre, the Cinémathèque québécoise. It is in its 21st edition (2003), that the FIFA added 5 additional days to its calender, totalling 10 days of festivities. For its 25th anniversary in 2007, more than 280 films from 25 countries were presented in eight theatres: the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Musée d’art contemporain, the Grande Bibliothèque, the Canadian Centre for Architecture, the Cinémathèque québécoise, the NFB Cinema, the Goethe-Institut and the Cinquième Salle of Place des Arts. In an effort to broaden its range of subjects, FIFA introduces films devoted to several new genres—mime, circus arts, tattooing and comics.

This year the festival runs in Montreal, Quebec, from March 18 through the 28th. You can the FIFA site for more information.

POLICE START BILLBOARD CAMPAIGN TO FIND STOLEN REMBRANDT

When two men dressed as Boston police officers made off with 13 works of art valued at $500 million from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in 1990, it was an art theft of unusual and shocking scale. Now the Federal Bureau of Investigations has announced it will mount a similarly ambitious effort to retrieve the paintings. They are offering a $5 million reward for the recovery and return of Rembrandt’s 1633 “Christ in the Storm on the Sea of Galilee”, in a billboard campaign along Interstates 93 and 495 in Massachusetts. Read whole article: artinfo

PICASSO’S ‘THE ABSINTHE DRINKER’ IS UP FOR AUCTION

In 2006,  Christie’s (New York) valued the 1903 painting, The Absinthe Drinker , at between $40 million and $60 million when British composer Andrew Lloyd Webber’s art foundation wanted to sell it. The initial scandal surrounding this sale, was Julius Schoeps, who sued the art foundation saying he was an heir of a Jewish banker from Berlin who was forced to sell the painting in 1934 as a “consequence of Nazi persecution.”  The case was dismissed due to the case lacking any federal jurisdiction.

Finally it is up for sale at Christie’s in London, which  announced this morning that it is to sell a rare blue-period Picasso portrait with a “conservative” estimate of between £30 million and £40 million, the highest for a work of art offered at auction in Europe. via timesonline

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